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Yahoo! Advertising Trends: Rising Search, Declining Display

Yahoo! advertising trends

Yahoo! advertising trends show an increase in search and a decrease in display. © Promise Media LLC

The fourth quarter 2014 earnings report announced by Yahoo! on Jan. 28 reveals a trend for not only this search giant but the others as well.

Search revenue continue to climb at a modest pace while display revenue show signs of trouble, mainly thanks to the shift toward mobile advertising. (more…)

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Yield Optimization Increases Revenue with Leftover Ad Impressions

Yield Optimization

The above example shows how yield optimization can increase revenue by 17%. © Promise Media LLC

One of the lesser known concepts in online advertising is yield optimization, which is a way of managing ad inventory to produce the highest average RPM or revenue per thousand impressions.

It starts with the basic idea that a site manager or sales team may not be able to sell out 100 percent of all ad impressions on a site.

The inventory that is left is an opportunity to make more money.

But the strategy is not simply about filling that leftover inventory with house ads, extra unpaid impressions for a client or even with a single remnant advertiser. (more…)

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Online Ad Inventory: 2 Tactics That Increase Revenue

Online ad inventory

A Web site without ad inventory for key sections is like a grocery store with empty shelves.

Sites that manage online advertising inventory will almost certainly generate more revenue than sites that don’t manage it.

Oddly, the concept is rarely discussed in the industry because it is easy to overlook when so much else requires attention.

Think of ad inventory this way: Is it better to have a site with 100,000 page views a month and three ads per page or a site with 200,000 page views a month and two ads per page?

The first site has 300,000 ad impressions a month while the other one has 400,000 a month.

That’s a no brainer. The second site has 33% more ad inventory and therefore is more valuable.

It also has a better user experience because it loads faster, and the odds are good that the ads have a better click rate because only two of them are competing for attention rather than three. (more…)

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What is Social Media Advertising?

Social media advertising is a category of digital advertising that places ads on social networking sites.

The five largest social media companies at the time of this writing are in order of audience size according to Quantcast:

  1. Facebook
  2. Twitter
  3. Linkedin
  4. Pinterest
  5. Google+

What makes these sites attractive to advertisers starts with their vast reach.

“Worldwide DAUs (Daily Active Users) increased 19% to 864 million on average during September 2014 from 728 million during September 2013,” Facebook said in its most recent quarterly report. (more…)

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Paid Search Advertising Brings Quick Profits, Narrow Margins

Paid search advertisingPaying Google and other search engines to advertise a site is an easy path for driving audience, revenue and ideally some profits.

But sites often don’t make big profits that way because they underestimate the amount of labor involved on top of the actual ad costs.

And then there is the issue of return on investment.

What happens when a visitor reaches the site? Do they generate enough sales to make the campaign worthwhile?

Even higher profits are found via search engine optimization — if the site manager limits the amount of time required to build and maintain SEO — because that audience doesn’t cost a dime.

Again, it’s only the labor that costs with SEO. (more…)

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Content Marketing Examples: Home Depot and Lowe’s

Content marketing is a method for distributing online content that contains a direct and measurable benefit to the core business.

The starting point often is a business that obviously or subtly sells products or services via the content itself. That’s an important distinction to make because traditional and digital media businesses also distribute online content with direct and measurable benefits to themselves.

But in the case of media, the actual content does not contain the sales message. The advertising around the content does that job.

In other words, a newspaper article or TV clip about a crime or government action don’t contain sales material asking or suggesting that people buy advertising for that newspaper or TV station.

Instead, the most common way for media Web sites to acquire advertisers is through a sales staff that contacts current or prospective clients.

The two largest home improvement stores in America provide useful examples of how content marketing works to attract customers and sell products. (more…)

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